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  • Help Therapy Newsletter - May 2022

    The Mental Health Connection Sunday, May 8th, is the day we celebrate our mothers. But May is also the month we bring awareness to the importance of mental health and treatment options available to those suffering with mental health issues. I’d like to propose a challenge to each of you. This month, discover something new that can help you with your treatment or interactions with a patient. Then implement what you learned. As a reminder, there’s still time to cast your votes in the 2022 San Diego’s Best Poll. We’re pushing for first place in the “In-Home Non-Medical” category this year! Voting takes place through May 10 Winners will be announced July 31 Thanks in advance for voting for us, and I hope you all accept the challenge. I’d love to hear how what you’ve learned has helped someone. Annette Conway, PsyD President Help Therapy May Focuses on Two Observances May is Mental Health Awareness Month and Borderline Personality Disorder Awareness Month. Mental Health Awareness Month Millions of Americans suffer from a mental illness or live with someone who does. Although the stigma around mental health issues and treatment is slowly dissolving, many people hesitate to seek help or even talk about it for fear of being judged. Mental Health Awareness Month shines a light on the importance of sound mental health and its relationship to physical health. One of the best ways to celebrate Mental Health Awareness Month is by talking about it. The more we talk about mental health and treatment, the more accepted it will become. Borderline Personality Disorder Awareness Month Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is the third leading cause of death among females 15-24 and affects about 14 million Americans. Yet, the diagnosis of BPD is frequently missed or misdiagnosed, especially in men. 3-Day Weekends for Californians? A new proposed bill could lead to Californians enjoying 3-day weekends. Under this bill, a standard workweek would be reduced from 40 hours to 32 hours—without employees losing any pay or benefits. The History of the 40-Hour Workweek The concept of the 40-hour workweek started in the 19th century when employees were commonly working 80 to 100 hours each week. After the Industrial Revolution, activists and labor union groups advocated for better working conditions. Then in 1869, President Ulysses S. Grant issued a proclamation guaranteeing eight-hour workdays for government employees. This decision encouraged private-sector workers to campaign for the same rights. But it wasn’t until 1926 that Henry Ford popularized the 40-hour workweek. His research revealed that working more hours resulted in only a slight increase in productivity. What's more, that productivity was short-lived. Then, in 1938, Congress passed the Fair Labor Standards Act, which required employers to pay overtime to all employees who worked more than 44 hours per week. It was later amended two years later to reduce the standard workweek to 40 hours per week and became law in 1940. Trying Out New Work Structures Much has changed since 1940—even before the pandemic. As a result, more companies have tried out or have implemented alternative work structures. Work from home, flextime and condensed workweeks are becoming more common arrangements. But these alternative working styles are still typically based on a 40-hour (or more) workweek. In fact, many people are working more with these alternative working arrangements without realizing it—especially when working from home. It’s often difficult to separate at-work time from at-home time when you’re working from home. Not all companies will be legally obligated to comply with this new workweek structure if the bill passes—only employers with more than 500 employees, according to the proposed legislation. Although the proposed 4-day, 32-hour workweek may not make a difference in the number of days and hours worked for some, it has the potential to help many people have a better work-life balance. The Components of a Psychological Evaluation for Bariatric Surgeries Help Therapy offers reference guides to partner therapists to assist them with psychological evaluations pertaining to bariatric surgery and spinal cord stimulator implants. However, therapists should always refer to the current standards and requirements of the pertinent State Board of Psychology before assessing patients. The principal goals of psychological pre-surgical evaluation are to: Determine a patient’s readiness for surgery Identify any psychological factors, obstacles or contraindications for surgery Screen candidates who may benefit from psychological treatment before surgery and to maximize the long term success of the surgery Identify patients who may need further psychological support after surgery Propose an alternative treatment when patients do not meet the criteria for bariatric surgery The most widely accepted psychiatric contraindications to bariatric surgery include: Active substance abuse Psychosis Mood disorders Major life stressors A history of problematic adherence to prior treatment plans and disagreement about binge eating disorder When psychosocial issues are identified, moving forward with the surgery may or may not be advisable. A therapy and treatment plan can be developed to address the patient's particular mental health challenges. This treatment may improve the outcome of the surgery. Types of tests for bariatric surgery readiness generally fall under one (or more) of the following categories: Personality Eating disorders Mood disorders Substance abuse Cognitive Development Physical Conditions Quality of Life Outcome measures [READ MORE] Welcome New Help Therapy Mental Health Provider Partners These mental healthcare practitioners are new to our network and offer psychological evaluations and other types of therapy with a range of specialties. They are accepting new patients and provide telehealth appointments. California Dr. Shalila Douglas Dr. Klayton Smith Dr. Bob Orkin Dr. Erin Gonzales Dr. Balaji Nettimi Remy Preston. LCSW Nicole Horne, LMF Dr. Lanique Ruffin Patricia Narez, LCSW Dr. Sasha Kassai Dr. Tikesha Leslie-Jones Texas Dr. Anna Felsl Washington Cynthia Langston, LCSW Featured Practitioner Dr. David Eagle, PsyD Dr. Eagle has been in practice for 45 years. His practice focuses on people with anxiety, depression or both—many with other chronic medical conditions like kidney failure or diabetes. He uses an eclectic approach to help patients experience more happiness and less anxiety or depression for a fuller and richer life. Although he primarily works with individuals, he does help couples as well. Dr. Eagle prefers in-person sessions in the patient's home but is open to telephone appointments. This Month's Tip Celebrate Mother’s Day in a New Way When you think of celebrating Mother’s Day, what comes to mind? Flowers? Brunch? See’s candy? For many, these are the traditional symbols of Mother’s Day. But why not give her something she will cherish even more? Your time! Give a Helping Hand Tackle a few tasks mom’s been putting off. Use the day as an opportunity to help check off items on her to-do list. Clean out garage Organize the pantry Fix the creaking door, uneven step… Weed the garden or repot a plant in a decorative planter Hire a handyman Encourage Self-Care Mom is sure to appreciate a few hours of self-care—especially if you can be by her side. Enjoy a mani-pedi Have a spa day Join a yoga in the park group Take a fitness class Explore nature Take a photo journey Photos have a special way of bringing up memories and emotions. Experience them together on her special day. Organize old photos Revisit old photo albums Create a new album Remember Her Remember your mother and celebrate her life by donating to a favorite charity or organization. Plant a tree Volunteer Give a memorial tribute Events World Maternal Mental Health Day May 4, 2022 See WMMH for more information. National Mental Health Counseling Week May 6-12, 2022 See AMHCA for more information. National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day May 9, 2022 See SAMHSA National Prevention Week May 11-17, 2022 See NPW for more information. “What mental health needs is more sunlight, more candor, and more unashamed conversation" -Glenn Close Partner With Us Are you a psychologist, LCSW or LMFT? We’re always looking for exceptional mental healthcare providers. Visit helptherapy.com for more information and fill out the quick and easy application. Benefits: Stream of new patients Billing off your plate Flexibility and Freedom Credentialing assistance No hidden costs Do you have something to share? We’d love to hear about your successes and accomplishments! Have you: Written an article? Given a presentation? Been featured on a podcast? Contact us at info@helptherapy.com. We welcome your feedback. What would you like to see in this newsletter? Do you have a topic you would like discussed? Have questions? Want to learn more about Help Therapy? Visit helptherapy.com, call 858-481-8827 or email info@helptherapy.com

  • Help Therapy Newsletter - April 2022

    The Mental Health Connection Spring is a time of renewal and rebirth. A celebration of life. Unfortunately, this particular Spring brings chaos and destruction to some parts of the World—specifically, the ongoing humanitarian crisis in the Ukraine. It’s situations like this upheaval in Ukraine that puts everything into perspective. We may wish some things were different in our lives, but we need to remember to be grateful for our lives the way they are, no matter what difficulties we face. This was brought to the forefront of our minds during the pandemic. We began to focus on what's most important to us and appreciate each day given to us. Now we can reflect on another of our blessings that is not universal and celebrate the freedom we enjoy living in the United States. The freedom we often take for granted. Our hearts go out to those individuals and families affected by war and displacement in Ukraine, and anyone with family or friends there. Annette Conway, PsyD President Help Therapy April is Sexual Assault, Stress and Autism Awareness Month Sexual Assault Awareness Every 68 seconds another American is sexually assaulted. At the start of Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) in the early 2000s, the goal was awareness. By the mid-2000s, SAAM added prevention—changing behaviors and promoting respect. A teal-colored ribbon became the symbol of this movement. This month marks the 21st anniversary of Sexual Assault Awareness Month. The focus is on online harassment. Although not viewed by some as being as psychologically damaging as in-person harassment, it can affect victims more publicly. Stress Awareness We often think of stress as affecting adults as they join the workforce, start a family and plan for the future. In fact, statistics show 80% of millennials are stressed about money. But stress is commonly experienced much earlier: Teenagers report a stress level of 5.8 out of 10 during the school year One in five college students has thought about suicide To bring more awareness to this far-reaching concern, April has been recognized as Stress Awareness Month since 1992. Autism Awareness One in 54 children has autism. Every April, since 1972, the Autism Society works to build an inclusive community where those with autism are embraced and supported. Autism Awareness Month emphasizes the need for public awareness to promote acceptance, celebrate the differences, and be more inclusive towards autistic individuals. Before Surgery—The Pre-Surgical Psychological Evaluation Process Why are Psychological Assessments (or Evaluations) Required Before Undergoing Surgery? Psychological Assessments are often required for specific surgeries, such as Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) surgery and Bariatric surgery, among others. They’re used not only to identify factors that may interfere with a positive outcome of the surgery but also to assess the readiness of the patient to undergo surgery and willingness to make the necessary lifestyle adjustments after the procedure. The results of Psychological Assessments have been proven to correlate with the success of the surgery. The more mental and physical stress an individual is under (or has experienced in the past), the less likely the surgery will be beneficial. Pre-existing Conditions Pain and mental health play significant roles in determining whether or not an individual is a good candidate for surgery. Pain is experienced differently by different people. The Central Texas Spine Institute reports that studies have shown that the more pain-sensitive a person is, the less likely the surgery, such as SCS, will have a positive outcome. Plus, the more prolonged pain is experienced, and the older the patient is, the less likely the result of the surgery will be favorable. [READ MORE] Another Reason to Use Care with Social Media Although continuing to grow in popularity and variety, Meta (Facebook), Twitter, Instagram, Tik Tok, YouTube and the like, new dangers of using these platforms are being discovered. These dangers can be particularly threatening to those with pre-existing mental health and neurological conditions, such as Tourettes. Tourette Syndrome typically develops in childhood, worsens in adolescence, and improves or disappears in adulthood. It’s often accompanied by other conditions such as ADHD, OCD, anxiety and depression. It can have multiple causes and numerous triggers. Research is finding that social media can be one of those triggers for many. Several studies have suggested that social media use can worsen symptoms in those with a tic disorder—adversely affecting their quality of life. A 2019 study of adolescents ages 12-15 found that spending more than 3 hours per day on social media may present a greater risk for mental health problems, including depression and anxiety. During the pandemic, results of a recent survey showed: 65% of respondents used social media an average of 5.6 hours per day. Approximately 90% reported increased use of social media during the pandemic. About half indicated social media adversely affected their tics. 85% said their tic frequency worsened during the pandemic. Davide Martino, MD, Ph.D., associate professor of neurology and director of the Movement Disorders Program, University of Calgary, said the survey is "very timely" as there has been limited research on the effects of social media consumption in individuals with tics. To reduce tic severity, it's important to identify triggers, including spending time on social media and then learn to manage them. It’s vital for those suffering from a tic disorder who experience certain social media content as a trigger to recognize the effect of this exposure on their symptoms. They can then decide what social media they want to consume and the amount of time spent on it—putting them in control of managing their symptoms. Dr. Martino recommends that "As we return to a lifestyle that is closer to pre-pandemic standards, this study prompts clinicians to follow more closely social media consumption in people with tics.” Welcome New Help Therapy Mental Health Providers Dr. Robin Abraham (AZ) Dr. Bernadette Heid (CA) Dr. Nina Nehring (CA) Dr. Benjamin Sandler (CA) Dr. Kim Mitchell (CA) Dr. Lisa Talerico (CA) LMFT Michelene Wasil (CA) Dr. Yanet Collazo (CA) Dr. Shalila Douglas (CA) Dr. Klayton Smith (CA) Dr. Lucy Papillon (CA) Featured Practitioner Dr. Roudabeh Rahbar, Psy.D Dr. Rahbar assists her clients along their life’s journey and helps them overcome obstacles that may be making the journey difficult. She uses her empathetic heart and mind, alongside her training and experience to collaborate with her clients and guide them on a path to a more fulfilling life. Her specialties include anxiety, depression, PTSD, cultural issues, couples therapy and psychological assessments. This Month's Tip 7 Activities to get you in the Spring Spirit 1. Visit a botanic garden or flower field Walking outdoors, surrounded by plants, trees and colorful flowers, can be relaxing and exhilarating. Spring is the perfect time to see a rainbow of colors. It may also inspire you to plan your own garden. 2. Plant a garden Planning a garden and going to a nursery to pick out plants and flowers is something many of us look forward to each Spring. No yard? No problem. A balcony, patio or sunny window are great places to grow and display potted plants. 3. Welcome Spring into your home Nothing says Spring like Spring flowers. Tulips Daffodils Crocuses Irises Lilies… If you bring home one of these potted plants, you can save the bulbs and plant them again in late Fall. With a bit of luck, you’ll be rewarded with flowers next Spring. 4. Do some Spring cleaning Cleaning doesn’t seem to be an activity that will lift your spirits, but the results are sure to. A neat and freshly cleaned home relaxes the mind. Having a lot of clutter and disorganization in your environment can cause stress—even if you’re not aware of it. 5. Color eggs You don’t have to be the Easter Bunny to have fun coloring eggs. You don’t even need to have young children around. A creative and relaxing activity, like coloring eggs, can be therapeutic. 6. Have a picnic Being outdoors in nature is good for the mind and body. Invite a friend; bring your children, or go on a date with your partner. 7. Explore Spring wildlife Find a pond, river or lake and watch for sunning turtles, fish, ducks, geese and other birds. You may even see some ducklings or goslings. Events National Sorry Charlie Day April 6, 2022 See kidadl for more information. RAINN Day April 13, 2022 See RAINN for more information. International Moment of Laughter Day April 14, 2022 See national today for more information. “No matter how many mistakes you make or how slow you progress, you are still way ahead of everyone who isn't trying" -Tony Robbins Partner With Us Are you a psychologist, LCSW or LMFT? We’re always looking for exceptional mental healthcare providers. Visit helptherapy.com for more information and fill out the quick and easy application. Benefits: Stream of new patients Billing off your plate Flexibility and Freedom Credentialing assistance No hidden costs Do you have something to share? We’d love to hear about your successes and accomplishments! Have you: Written an article? Given a presentation? Been featured on a podcast? Contact us at info@helptherapy.com. We welcome your feedback. What would you like to see in this newsletter? Do you have a topic you would like discussed? Have questions? Want to learn more about Help Therapy? Visit helptherapy.com, call 858-481-8827 or email info@helptherapy.com

  • The Components of a Psychological Evaluation for Bariatric Surgeries

    Help Therapy offers reference guides to partner therapists to assist them with psychological evaluations pertaining to bariatric surgery and spinal cord stimulator implants. However, therapists should always refer to the current standards and requirements of the pertinent State Board of Psychology before assessing patients. The principal goals of psychological pre-surgical evaluation are to: Determine a patient’s readiness for surgery Identify any psychological factors, obstacles or contraindications for surgery Screen candidates who may benefit from psychological treatment before surgery and to maximize the long term success of the surgery Identify patients who may need further psychological support after surgery Propose an alternative treatment when patients do not meet the criteria for bariatric surgery The most widely accepted psychiatric contraindications to bariatric surgery include: Active substance abuse Psychosis Mood disorders Major life stressors A history of problematic adherence to prior treatment plans and disagreement about binge eating disorder When psychosocial issues are identified, moving forward with the surgery may or may not be advisable. A therapy and treatment plan can be developed to address the patient's particular mental health challenges. This treatment may improve the outcome of the surgery. Types of tests for bariatric surgery readiness generally fall under one (or more) of the following categories: Personality Eating disorders Mood disorders Substance abuse Cognitive Development Physical Conditions Quality of Life Outcome measures There are a multitude of test batteries under these categories to choose from, such as: Alcohol Use Disorder Test-Core (AUDIT-C) Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST) Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic (MBMD) Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) Scales Questionnaire on Weight and Eating Patterns-Revised (QEWP-R) Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) Eating Expectancy Questionnaire Shipley Institute of Living Scale Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI) Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) Weight and Lifestyle Inventory (WALI) Million Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic (MBMD) Battery for Health Improvement 2 (BHI 2) Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2- Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) Eating Inventory (EI) Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI) Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) Eating Disorder Inventory-2 The Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire (TSQR) Perceived Competence Scale (PCS) Health Care Climate Questionnaire (HCCQ) General Causality Orientations Scale (GCOS) Attitudes towards Behavior Perceived Behavior Control (PBC) Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) As you can see, the options can become overwhelming. It’s important to include the necessary tests while keeping in mind the stress they may cause the patient and the length of time each of these tests take to complete. Some evaluations may take 5 minutes, such as the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), while others may take close to 2 hours, such as the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2- Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF). Before selecting your test battery, consider these questions: 1. Is the measure appropriate for this patient? 2. Does the test (or combination of tests) address the relevant issues, such as: General psychopathology Enduring personality traits or characterological problems Emotional symptoms Behavioral predispositions such as: Detrimental eating attitudes and behaviors Substance abuse Suicidal thoughts Impulsivity Maladaptive coping style Difficulty with attention Motivation for procedure The likelihood of complying with treatment and adherence to self-management guidelines When the patient completes the selected test batteries and they are scored and all other assessments are finished, the psychological evaluation is then written. This assessment generally includes the following sections: Tests Administered Brief History and Reason for Referral Medical and Pain Interview Behavioral Observation Test Results Recommendations Psychological evaluation of patients before bariatric surgery is a critical step. This process can not only identify risk factors for surgery but also better understand the patient's motivation, readiness, behavioral challenges and emotional factors that may be detrimental to their ability to cope with and adjust to post-surgery lifestyle changes properly. The psychologist's challenge is to collect data while simultaneously educating and motivating the patient in their pursuit of improved health and quality of life. For some patients, the initial evaluation is all they need to move forward. However, it’s just the beginning for many, as they will need additional psychological support to maintain the lifestyle changes essential for long-term post-operative success. If you’re a Help Therapy provider partner, you can request a copy of the Psychological Evaluations Bariatric Surgery Manual and Reference Guide by emailing us at info@helptherapy.com.

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  • Peer Consultation Registration | Help Therapy

    RSVP Upcoming Help Therapy Provider Partner Events June Peer Consult Group Fri, Jun 03 Online Zoom Meeting Jun 03, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM PDT Online Zoom Meeting We will be hosting our second Help Therapy Peer Consult Group of 2022. This event will be proctored by our CEO, Dr. Annette Conway, PsyD. We will be focusing on client cases and clinical discussion. Agenda to come. RSVP

  • Contact Help Therapy

    Have Questions? we're here to help Send us an Email info@helptherapy.com Give us a call today 858-481-8827 Connect With Your Therapist If you prefer to fill the intake form out by hand, you can securely fax to 858-244-0990 Please Note: We are not able to provide crisis services outside of regularly scheduled appointments and normal business hours. ​ In the case of an emergency please call 911, go to your local emergency room, or call the toll free San Diego County Crisis Line (888-724-7240), Emergency Phone Numbers: Adult Abuse Reporting/Crisis Intervention: 1-800-510-2020 National Suicide Hotline: 1-800-SUICIDE(784-2433) San Diego Crisis Hotline: 1-800-479-3339 San Diego Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-619-234-3164

  • Match with a Therapist | Help Therapy

    Make An Appointment Connecting Patients to the Right Providers 29 Years Of Experience For the past 29 years HELP mental health provider partners have been able to assist members of our communities in a rather unique way, opening the doors to mental health services for a large number of individuals, couples, and families who would otherwise be unable to obtain treatment. Help Therapy mental health provider partners offers mental health counseling and evaluations services in the home, facility, in an office setting, or via telehealth. Serving California, Arizona, Washington and Texas Here to HELP Offering In-Home, In-Office, In-Community & via Video or Phone Visits Register Today. Be matched with a therapist in 3-5 days Why Patients choose HELP Therapy? HELP Therapy mental health provider partners respect the dignity and worth of each individual and feel maintaining confidentiality is a primary responsibility for clinicians, as well as a key ingredient to successful therapy. ​ We offer access to a variety of counseling and evaluation services. As a result, we are able to reach patients where they are comfortable or able to receive services - in-home, in-office, in-facility or via telephone/video. The team at Help does a wonderful job of thoughtfully connecting the right providers to the right patients. Appreciate that this company looks to provide high quality therapy solutions with options to suit patients specific needs! Personalized and professional - you are NOT just a number as a patient or a provider. - Help Therapy User Services Offered Home Visits The home visit from mental health providers might be the only option open to many who suffer from a chronic disease, a physical or mental disability, or medical complications. As well, home visits provide access to mental health services for those older adults and elderly who are homebound. In-home clinicians mental health providers can also provide the initial steps to receiving additional community services. Facility Visits The facility visit provides mental health and counseling services to those in short-term and long-term care. Care is coordinated with the case managers, primary care physicians, and other health providers. Upon discharge, HELP clinicians are able to provide continuation of care in the home or office. Office Visits The office visit can be utilized for those who prefer the office setting. Utilizing both the home and office visit is another option for those who have been homebound for an extended period of time. Telehealth Counseling Connect with HELP Provider Partners via video or phone. Telehealth provides services for clients in remote areas or who have mobility challenges or anyone who prefers online counseling. No travel required to consult with a HELP therapist. Convenience from the comfort of your home, stress free and confidential. COVID-19 has opened the door to more opportunities to connect with your provider wherever you are. Don't miss appointments during this stressful time. ​ No monthly set-up fee, no hidden costs. Choose your therapist and preference. ​ We are here for you, wherever you are. Learn More Learn More Insurances Accepted: Medicare, Triwest Alliance, Tricare, Optum, Blue Shield, Blue Cross, Beacon, Aetna, Medi-Cal, TriCare, most PPO's & private pay. No Physician Referral required HELP offers a wide array of Licensed Clinical Psychologists, Social Workers, MFTs, NP, RN. Each HELP Provider Partner has his or her own specialty, and is referred to the client according to their expertise and geographical location You are assigned to a therapist in 3-5 days Our Provider Partners specialize in meeting the needs of children, adolescents, adults and geriatric patients. We have therapists who treat both mental health, substance use issues and are highly skilled in evaluations. Additionally, HELP trained Provider Partners can provide individual, couples, and family therapy. They will develop an individualized treatment plan with you. Multiple languages spoken. Ask us! Serving Clients in California, Arizona, Texas & Washington Visit our Headquarters located in Hillcrest (neighborhood of San Diego) Address: 3636 4th Ave, Suite 302, San Diego, CA 92103 Click For Directions Get In Touch

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