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  • Help Therapy Newsletter - October 2021

    The Mental Health Connection Help Therapy is once again looking forward to participating in the annual Navy SEAL Foundation Impact Forum. It’s scheduled for October 4-6, 2021, in La Jolla, CA. This event offers Navy SEALS, along with other veterans and their families the opportunity to learn about behavioral health resources. Many of our provider partners work with veterans—many TriWest and TriCare patients. This event is the opportunity for mental health professionals to listen to guest speakers speak on topics related to mental health concerns facing veterans, providing valuable knowledge they can take back to their practice. We would love to hear from you about your veteran therapy success stories or other knowledge you have gained and would like to share with our readers. Contact us at info@helptherapy.com. We’ve received one such article from Dr. Mark S. Lytle about hypnosis. Be sure to read it further down in the newsletter. Have a safe and happy Halloween. Annette Conway PsyD CEO Help Therapy October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month and ADHD Awareness Month National Domestic Violence Awareness Month According to the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN): An average of 20 people are physically abused by intimate partners every minute. One in three women and one in four men have been physically abused in some way by an intimate partner. One in five women and one in seven men have been severely physically abused by an intimate partner. This month is a time to acknowledge domestic violence survivors and be a voice for its victims. ADHD Awareness Month October is also designated as ADHD Awareness Month, sponsored by the Attention Deficit Disorder Association. During this month, the latest research and clinical studies are highlighted, to discover more effective treatments for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Millions of Americans are affected by ADHD, many without realizing it. The association recommends getting tested for ADHD if you tend to procrastinate, have trouble focusing on a task or generally lack motivation. Halloween Anxiety For some, scary movies, gory images and haunted houses can trigger anxiety. For those suffering from a mental illness, it can be disabling. Here are four ways to help you cope with Halloween and ease anxiety. 1. Acknowledge the Problem People with Halloween-induced anxiety may feel embarrassed about their fear, but their feelings are valid. Telling someone not to be scared or that they’re silly or a coward can make the situation worse. Although Halloween depictions, characters and situations aren’t real, the fear is. Acknowledging these feelings is the first step to managing them. 2. Explore the Why Sometimes it may be apparent why you have a particular fear. Maybe you went through a traumatic event around Halloween, like an accident or a death. Maybe as a child you got separated from your family and got lost in a haunted house. Other times, the “why” is buried. Exploring where your fears and anxieties come from through journaling or working with a therapist can help you identify the source and find ways to work through the trauma. 3. Find Other Ways to Celebrate It’s important to let people that care about you know what you are willing and not willing to do. Setting boundaries and expectations can help you avoid difficult upcoming situations. If your friend wants to go to a haunted house or scary movie, you can suggest another less stressful Halloween or Fall activity. You may feel more comfortable carving pumpkins or baking cute Fall-themed cookies. 4. Learn Coping Mechanisms You can’t always avoid the things that trigger anxiety, especially at Halloween. It’s a big holiday for many, celebrated with decorations, parties and costumes. Your neighbors may have disturbing decorations in their yard and your office may encourage everyone to wear costumes and even give out trick or treat candy. Fortunately, there are coping mechanisms that can help, including: Being around people who don’t suffer from the same fears can be a way to cope with your anxiety. Learning relaxation techniques, like deep breathing, can reduce anxiety. Talking about your anxiety with someone who won’t judge you can bring your fears out in the open where they can be addressed. Consider Hypnosis By Mark S. Lytle, Psy.D When I began my practice as a psychotherapist in San Diego, I taught a class on "Self-Hypnosis and Meditation" and it was so successful I sometimes taught it four nights a week. I had never taught it to a group up until that time. I quickly found out that there were many definitions of what people called hypnosis. I had taught myself hypnosis and smile as I recall that I believe I was driven to learn the skill as a teen to gain confidence and have more control with the opposite sex! That, plus my belief in the power of my own mind, was more than enough to motivate me to become a skilled operator. In graduate school and doing an internship at a San Diego hypnosis clinic, my skills and knowledge improved. During my early years in San Diego (as well as California), I explored practically every meditation group I heard of. I was told by some how different meditation and hypnosis were, but the more I learned, the more similarity I saw. Without getting into a long conversation, I am now of the belief that they are very much the same. I have often said it depends on the purpose and technique used while in the trance. I am satisfied to use the term altered state of consciousness and everyone has experienced that. Even prayer can be included in such a category. But for the sake of brevity, let us stick to the topic "hypnosis” in this article, yet begin with the idea of trance. We have all done things without thinking, driven past our exit, gone into a room and forgotten what we went for and many other unconscious acts. Everyone has a non-conscious part of their mind. Using hypnosis can help one become more in touch with the inner mind. This can be utilized in many ways. Hypnosis is used these days to relieve pain, to enhance well-being, to perform surgery, to ward off nausea, to overcome addictions and to discover the root of a number of psychological problems. People heal faster with hypnosis, experience less anxiety, overcome fears and improve their quality of life. AND you cannot overdose or become addicted, and it has no side effects. No prescription is required and it is capable of treating scores of different conditions. It is clearly a technique to be considered. Depression and the Elderly Everyone needs social connections to thrive. But as people age, they often find themselves spending more time alone. Loneliness and social isolation are associated with higher rates of depression. Although many older adults felt isolated and lonely before COVID-19, the pandemic has amplified this situation. Many seniors view visits with family and friends as special events—something to look forward to with excited anticipation. These visits may be what keeps the individual thriving. When they’re changed from in-person contact to just conversations on the phone—or worse, to infrequent or nonexistent contact—depression may be the result. Prevalence of Depression Among Older Adults Depression isn’t an inevitable part of getting older. But life’s changes such as retirement, declining health and the death of loved ones can trigger depression. A 2019 National Survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics revealed several statistics regarding depression: 18.4% of adults 65 and older in the survey experienced symptoms of depression. Women were more likely than men to experience symptoms of depression. Asian adults were least likely to experience symptoms of depression compared with Hispanic, white and black adults. Other statistics revealed by the CDC show: 13.5% of the elderly requiring home care suffer from depression 11.5% of the elderly hospitalized suffer from depression [READ MORE] This Month's Tip 10 Ways to Celebrate Fall Two Popular holiday celebrations happen in the Fall— Halloween and Thanksgiving. But Fall isn’t just about these traditional celebrations. Fall is a beautiful time to get outdoors, bring nature indoors and try a few Fall-inspired foods and drinks. Here are ten fun ways to celebrate Autumn: Collect natures gifts of Fall: colorful leaves, acorns, pinecones, seed pods and berries Go to a pumpkin patch Decorate your home with Fall-themed wreaths, pumpkins, gourds, scarecrows and foliage arrangements Bake pumpkin bread or pumpkin muffins Pick apples Try a new Fall drink: a pumpkin spice latte, chai tea or apple cider Make caramel apples Host a harvest party potluck Attend an Octoberfest Go on a hayride "In any given moment, we have two options: to step forward into growth or to step back into safety." — Abraham Maslow Featured Practitioner Monica Thoelke, MA, LMFT Monica is a marriage & family therapist with nine years of experience. Her practice focuses on working with young adults, adults transitioning through life stages, and those struggling with ADHD, Anxiety, parenthood, and other challenges. Depending on the therapy goals, she uses a variety of approaches that may include Art Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Existential Therapy. Monica describes herself as “a warm and approachable person who brings a positive, honest, grounded perspective to each session.” She offers online video and phone sessions through a HIPAA compliant online teletherapy service. Events National Heritage Month September 15 - October 15, 2021 See National Hispanic Heritage Month for more information. Impact Forum 2021 October 4-6, 2021 See NAVY SEAL FOUNDATION for more information. Mental Health Awareness Week October 4-10, 2021 See NAMI for more information. National Depression Screening Day October 7, 2021 See IAB Health Productions for more information. World Mental Health Day October 10, 2021 See WHO for more information. International OCD Awareness Week October 10-16, 2021 See International OCD Foundation for more information. National Coming Out Day October 11, 2021 See Human Rights Campaign for more information. National Stop Bullying Day October 14, 2021 See National Day Calendar for more information. Partner With Us Are you a psychologist, LCSW or LMFT? We’re always looking for exceptional mental healthcare providers. Visit helptherapy.com for more information and fill out the quick and easy application. Benefits: Stream of new patients Billing off your plate Flexibility and Freedom Credentialing assistance No hidden costs Do you have something to share? We’d love to hear about your successes and accomplishments! Have you: Written an article? Given a presentation? Been featured on a podcast? Contact us at info@helptherapy.com. We welcome your feedback. What would you like to see in this newsletter? Do you have a topic you would like discussed? Have questions? Want to learn more about Help Therapy? Visit helptherapy.com, call 858-481-8827 or email info@helptherapy.com

  • Depression and the Elderly

    Everyone needs social connections to thrive. But as people age, they often find themselves spending more time alone. Loneliness and social isolation are associated with higher rates of depression. Although many older adults felt isolated and lonely before COVID-19, the pandemic has amplified this situation. Many seniors view visits with family and friends as special events—something to look forward to with excited anticipation. These visits may be what keeps the individual thriving. When they’re changed from in-person contact to just conversations on the phone—or worse, to infrequent or nonexistent contact—depression may be the result. Prevalence of Depression Among Older Adults Depression isn’t an inevitable part of getting older. But life’s changes such as retirement, declining health and the death of loved ones can trigger depression. A 2019 National Survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics revealed several statistics regarding depression. 18.4% of adults 65 and older in the survey experienced symptoms of depression. Women were more likely than men to experience symptoms of depression. Asian adults were least likely to experience symptoms of depression compared with Hispanic, white and black adults. Other statistics revealed by the CDC show: 13.5% of the elderly requiring home care suffer from depression 11.5% of the elderly hospitalized suffer from depression Medical Conditions and Medication Any medical condition, especially those that are painful, debilitating or life-threatening, can result in symptoms of depression. On top of that, medications used to treat many of these conditions also increase the risk of depression in older adults. Anti-inflammatory drugs, cardiovascular drugs, chemotherapy drugs, anticonvulsants, hormone drugs , sedatives and stimulants are some of these medications. Symptoms of Depression Depression in the elderly can manifest in many ways. It’s important to know the signs of depression and what to look for in seniors. Below are symptoms of depression that may be present. Persistent sadness Feeling worthless or helpless Loss of interest in social activities or hobbies Unexplained or aggravated pain or digestive problems Weight loss or loss of appetite Lack of motivation and energy Increased use of alcohol or drug Fixation on death Memory difficulties Neglecting personal care Pacing or fidgeting Unhealthy sleep patterns Difficulty concentrating Excessive worrying Frequent tearfulness Slowed movement or speech Depression or Grieving? One of the consequences of getting old is experiencing the decline and death of loved ones. Depending on the size of the family and number of friends, watching people close to them become ill and die may become a frequent occurrence. Besides dealing with the pain of losing someone who may have been a part of their lives for decades, it also reminds them of their own mortality. Grieving and depression can share symptoms, making it difficult to know which is the cause of the symptoms, but there is one point of distinction. That distinction is the experience of joy. Emotions can change from hour to hour and day to day, but moments of happiness and pleasure can still be felt when grieving, rather than constant despair. Depression or Dementia? Some of the symptoms of dementia and depression can also seem similar. Below are signs of dementia to look for. Becoming confused and disoriented Struggling with short-term memory Not noticing or seeming to care about memory problems Writing, speaking, and language skills become impaired Treatment Antidepressants and therapy are often the recommended treatment. But lifestyle factors can play a big part in helping a senior to feel better, too. Daily exercise, healthy eating habits and increasing social support are important lifestyle factors that can help individuals struggling with depression. Friends and family members may need to be enlisted to help the senior implement these healthy and healing lifestyle changes. Establishing routines can help. Examples include going for a walk every day at 9 am, shopping at the market for fresh vegetables and fruit every Saturday afternoon and joining a club or organization that meets every Tuesday at 11 am. The specifics of the activity are less important than the act of actively participating in healthy lifestyle changes.

  • Help Therapy Newsletter - September 2021

    The Mental Health Connection Back in June, we were honored to be nominated as one of San Diego’s Best in The San Diego Union-Tribune’s readers poll. I’m happy to announce that Help Therapy was voted one of San Diego’s Best for 2021, not once, but twice! We appreciate your support and entrusting Help Therapy with the care of your clients. Now, more than ever, mental healthcare providers play an essential role as we learn to adapt to our ever-changing and uncertain world. One of the focuses of this month, suicide prevention, clearly demonstrates that many people desperately need the help and support of skilled and caring mental healthcare professionals. We’ll continue to do our best in providing your referrals with the most qualified providers best suited to each of their particular needs and desires. As a reminder, we’d love to share your accomplishments with our community members, such as patient success stories and presentations. Contact us at info@helptherapy.com. Sincerely, Annette Conway Psy.D CEO Help Therapy September is National Recovery Month Millions of lives have been transformed through recovery from a substance use and/or other mental health illness. Yet, these successes often go unnoticed by the general population. National Recovery Month (Recovery Month) aims to educate people—proving that those with a substance abuse and/or mental health illness can and do live healthy and rewarding lives. This observance further spreads the message that behavioral health is an essential part of overall health and that treatment is effective and people can and do recover. The day was established by the Association for Addiction Professionals (NAADAC) to commemorate the hard work and dedication of addiction professionals. This years’ National Recovery Month theme is, “Recovery is For Everyone: Every Person, Every Family, Every Community.” The Future of Telehealth Since the pandemic’s beginning, many of us have embraced telehealth as an alternative to in-office visits. States enhanced private insurance coverage of telehealth services to encourage the use of these virtual appointments. But as time goes on there is concern around future billing and reimbursement. Policymakers are now considering how best to regulate telemedicine moving forward. Should pay parity remain, revert to pre-pandemic rates or should new policies be implemented? Those in favor of keeping pay parity argue that pre-COVID 19 telehealth rates are too low for healthcare providers. Those against pay parity contend that lower payment rates should be established for telehealth services to avoid overuse. Healthcare professionals offering telehealth services need to know how to bill patients and receive reimbursement in this ever-changing environment. If you need help navigating through the twists and turns of the telehealth environment, this Telehealth Reimbursement Guide may be beneficial. This guide answers questions such as: How do you bill for telemedicine? How does reimbursement differ for Medicare or Medicaid vs. private payers? Time will tell how the patient-therapist relationship and the outcomes of therapy will be affected by virtual sessions and if it’s a cost-effective practice for patient and practitioner. 6 Tips to Get the Most Out of Therapy The ability to work with a mental health expert is becoming more accessible due to the availability of telehealth. Here are six tips to getting the most out of therapy you may want to share. Working with a psychologist, therapist, or other mental health professional can be life-changing for those suffering from a mental illness. But you don’t need to be diagnosed with a disorder to benefit from therapy. Therapy gives you the opportunity to be heard. It’s a safe place to explore your thoughts, feelings, and patterns of behavior. The ability to work with a mental health expert is becoming more accessible due to the availability of telehealth. Here are six tips to getting the most out of therapy you may want to share. 1. Find the Therapist That’s the Right Fit for You Not every mental healthcare provider will be a good fit. Therapists have varied training, specialize in different types of mental illness and use different techniques. Start by clearly identifying what you are seeking help for. If you’re struggling with anxiety, for example, you may find a therapist who regularly treats anxiety a better fit than one specializing in substance abuse. You also want to consider what type of sessions you prefer—in-office, at home or online. You may even have the option to have some of your sessions in-office and others online. Read more This Month's Tip 3 Ways to Boost Your Mental Health This is a list of three small but impactful ways to enhance your mental health, bringing more joy and reducing stress. 1. Practice self-care and make yourself a priority Eat a healthy diet Exercise Get quality sleep Practice mindfulness or meditation Take daily “me time” 2. Disconnect from electronics and social media Establish an electronics-free time Turn off WiFi before going to sleep Avoid checking email and social media as soon as you get up 3. Engage in activities that provide meaning Take up a hobby Volunteer Spend time in nature Travel "Anything that’s human is mentionable, and anything that is mentionable can be more manageable. When we can talk about our feelings, they become less overwhelming, less upsetting, and less scary." — Fred Rogers Featured Practitioner Dr. Ernest Llynn Lotecka Ernest Llynn Lotecka, Ph.D., has practiced behavioral health psychology for over three decades. He has worked with a wide range of clients on successful solutions to life’s challenges — specializing in PTSD, anxiety, depression and social problems. Dr. Lotecka’s professional approach emphasizes coping skills and improving the quality of relationships. He has worked with adults, children and families in a variety of outpatient, residential, home, and day programs including addiction treatment. He also embraces telehealth as a way to connect with many of his clients. His history includes community service and training, research and authoring several publications, including: People Skills and Self-Management — how to learn important skill sets including communications, relationships, focusing, goal-setting, relaxation/serenity, and decision-making. Attention. Better Attention, and Best Attention — a compact focusing guide for clarifying, mobilizing, engaging, strengthening, and sustaining valued priorities with a range of proven methods to assist in obtaining goals. Events National Suicide Prevention Month September 1 -30, 2021 See the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline for more information. National Suicide Prevention Week September 6-12, 2021 See Health Resources & Services Administration for more information. World Suicide Prevention Day September 10, 2021 See National Today for more information. National HIV/AIDS Day and National Aging Awareness Day September 18, 2021 See HIV.gov and CDC for more information. World Alzheimer’s Day September 21, 2021 See awareness Days and Alzheimer's Disease international for more information. National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day September 27, 2021 See CDC for more information. Partner With Us Are you a psychologist, LCSW or LMFT? We’re always looking for exceptional mental healthcare providers. Visit helptherapy.com for more information and fill out the quick and easy application. Benefits: Stream of new patients Billing off your plate Flexibility and Freedom Credentialing assistance No hidden costs Do you have something to share? We’d love to hear about your successes and accomplishments! Have you: Written an article? Given a presentation? Been featured on a podcast? Contact us at info@helptherapy.com. We welcome your feedback. What would you like to see in this newsletter? Do you have a topic you would like discussed? Have questions? Want to learn more about Help Therapy? Visit helptherapy.com, call 858-481-8827 or email info@helptherapy.com

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  • Help Therapy | Counseling & Psychological Services

    Don't settle for less CONNECT WITH A TOP RATED THERAPIST Connect With Your Therapist Individual, Couples, Family & Counseling Referrals Match With Your Therapist Psychological Evaluations and Pre-Surgical Screenings Psychological Evaluations Interested in becoming a Provider Partner? Interested In Becoming A Provider Partner? Help Therapy's purpose is to break down barriers to exceptional mental health care for people of all ages, cultures, socioeconomic levels, accessibility challenges, and treatment needs. We create this opportunity for patients by freeing providers from the administrative worry that comes with owning a practice so they focus on delivering exceptional care to their patients. HELP has been connecting Patients to Providers since 1993. Meet with a Provider that meets your needs Fill out an Intake Form and match with a Provider in 3-5 days Make An Appointment We take care of you- ​ So you can take care of your patients. Become A Provider How It Works Help is dedicated to making the process of connecting therapists and patients an easy and meaningful process. 01 02 03 Submit a Simple Questionnaire Tell us about your goals for therapy, your preferred payment method & your preferred location. We use your feedback and preferences to connect you with the RIGHT therapist for your journey. Making a referral? Fill out what you can and our schedulers will handle the rest. (although, no referral necessary) Match with your Therapist HELP works hard to match you with a therapist that takes your insurance and meets your needs as a patient. Begin Therapy HELP works with therapists that cover over 100 different specialities, allow for a variety of insurance and cash pay options and provide therapy and evaluations in several different settings (including In-Home, In-Office, In-Facility and Telehealth modalities). Interested in Psychological Evaluations and Screenings? Sign Up For Our Monthly Newsletter Serving Areas Throughout California, Washington & Colorado We are here to help. At your home, facility or our office. Call (858) 481-8827 FEEL BETTER. Offering an expert team of therapists. Caring for patients since 1993.

  • Nancy Fader MA LMFT

    Specialties Eating Disorders, TRAUMA, PTSD, Relationship Issues, Marriage Issues, Anxiety, Depression, Self-Esteem, Internal Family Systems, Brainspotting, EMDR, Alzheimer's, Chronic Illness, Divorce Issues, Life Transitions, Parenting, Pregnancy, Postpartum, Prenatal, CBT, DBT I became a therapist because I felt called to help others resolve their emotional pain and suffering, and to regain their mental health and well-being. I strive to provide empathy, active listening, validation, and connection with my clients, while helping them to uncover and cultivate their strengths. I have been drawn to vulnerable populations and passionate about my work, I take pride in providing culturally competent therapy to San Diego's diverse communities. Areas of Specialty-Eating Disorders, Body Image, PTSD, Trauma, Relationship/Marriage Issues, Depression, Anxiety, Post-partum Depression, Discrimination, Motherhood, Divorce, Parent Teen Interaction Issues, Family Conflict. My clients describe me as warm, patient, and non-judgmental. With a deep and authentic love for my work, I find myself endlessly challenged and rewarded. I understand when life becomes overwhelming that it is important to talk to someone. Team Page Continue Nancy Fader, MA, LMFT Continue Schedule Your Appointment Today Get Started At your home, facility or our office: Make An Appointment Make A Referral Sign-up For Our Monthly Newsletter Send Thank you for signing up! Telephone: 858-481-8827 Toll free: 855-449-0159 Email: info@helptherapy.com

  • Contact Help Therapy

    Have Questions? we're here to help Send us an Email info@helptherapy.com Give us a call today 858-481-8827 Connect With Your Therapist If you prefer to fill the intake form out by hand, you can securely fax to 858-244-0990 Please Note: We are not able to provide crisis services outside of regularly scheduled appointments and normal business hours. ​ In the case of an emergency please call 911, go to your local emergency room, or call the toll free San Diego County Crisis Line (888-724-7240), Emergency Phone Numbers: Adult Abuse Reporting/Crisis Intervention: 1-800-510-2020 National Suicide Hotline: 1-800-SUICIDE(784-2433) San Diego Crisis Hotline: 1-800-479-3339 San Diego Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-619-234-3164

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